Office Autopilot vs. Infusionsoft

Jan 4, 2012

I’ve used both Office Autopilot and Infusionsoft.  Both are ugly pieces of software on the backend — and tremendously functional (it’s what happens when you hire the best programmers and the worst designers).  But enough of my beef about the poor UI’s…

Here’s the difference: Office Autopilot is ugly, but it is straightforward to use and where it is complex, it is because of the tremendous functionality.  Infusionsoft is ugly, but it is needlessly complex and unnecessarily complicated.

Case in point: adding custom fields.  With OfficeAutopilot, you click to the admin area and click to add custom fields.  Everything is done in this screen.  With Infusionsoft (at least when I last used it), it took a training manual to figure out how to navigate the levels-deep structure of the fields to add a new one.

With the fields thing, Office Autopilot’s simplicity in the matter comes at a cost… once you put a field into a certain section, you can’t later on recategorize the field into a new section without deleting and recreating the field.

A lot of the differences are of this vein.  Office Autopilot lacks some of the deeper complexities, but the trade-off makes for a more straightforward user experience.  (That isn’t to say that Office Autopilot isn’t needlessly complex in areas — but their complexity is more due to a bad interface design that you eventually get used to.)

Both systems will help you automate your backend follow-up and will be more than worth your money (if you’re already making money).

As you can tell, I recommend Office Autopilot (see my full review).

By the way, there’s rumors that Office Autopilot is soon coming out with a brand new interface.  I first heard these rumors over a year ago, but instead of a redesign they added more features — such as WordPress integration.  I think they suffer from “rockstar programmer syndrome”.  This is what I call it when you have a rockstar programmer that everyone admires so much for their programming skills, but doesn’t want to call them out on their lack of project management skills.  It’s like having a rockstar carpenter build a house from scratch with his own blueprint.  Sure, they know how to build things great — but shouldn’t architects and designers be consulted??

Well, the tradeoff is that we’re comparing Office Autopilot with Infusionsoft and not Office Autopilot with Marketo — which would cost you a few thousand a month instead of a few hundred.   Office Autopilot’s amateur interface hides exceptional functionality that would cost you a TON more if they had put more money into wrapping it in a bow.

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2 Responses so far | Have Your Say!

  1. Landon
    January 17th, 2012 at 6:18 pm #

    Hey Chris,

    This is possibly the nicest way I’ve ever been insulted in my life, thanks! :)

    FYI, we really are – have been – working on a complete interface revamp for more than a year. It’s nearing completion, will be in alpha in a few weeks. Plan to publicly launch in May (serious testing, cause this really is ‘from scratch’ brand new)

    All of the issues you describe (not being able to move fields, etc) and a whole lot more are solved with the coming update.

    Thanks for your support even with the fruit-loop interface! (I did that myself in 2006, in photoshop.. can you tell?)

    :)

    Landon Ray
    Founder/CEO
    OfficeAutopilot.com

  2. Joshua Monen
    March 29th, 2013 at 6:58 pm #

    @Landon: thanks for the comment. I’m an OAP user and appreciate everything you guys do over there!

    @Chris: thank you for your review of these 2 systems. The more I use Infusion and OAP the more I like OAP… For example, have you ever tried to split-test an email from Infusion? It’s nearly impossible. But in AOP it’s so easy!

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